Now Playing Tracks

  • Guy on train:

    I'd fuck you if you didn't have so many tattoos.

  • Me:

    *turns up music*

  • Guy:

    I said I'd fuck you if you didn't have so many tattoos!

  • Me:

    *takes off headphones* Leave. Me. Alone.

  • Guy:

    Why the fuck do you have so many tattoos?

  • Me:

  • Guy:

    Are you fucking deaf as well as a piece of trash?

  • Lady by door:

    Hey. Leave her alone.

  • Guy:

    Are you her trash girlfriend? Fucking dykes, all tattooed like fucking men. Disgusting waste of pussy.

  • Lady:

    *moves forward, carefully moves jacket so only I can see the badge on her belt* Are you okay?

  • Me:

    Fine. Just wish he'd go away.

  • Lady cop:

    I can make that happen.

  • Guy:

    Oh, yeah, bitch? Who the fuck are you? I'll kill you!

  • Lady cop:

    And that's what I was waiting for. *grabs guy, holds him against the door* Harassing women on the train was enough, but you just threatened a cop. You're battin' a thousand tonight.

  • Entire train:

    *applauds*

celestialmazer:

THE ARCHAEOLOGY OF A DRESS
Restored dress as worn by Ellen Terry in her 1888 portayal of Lady Macbeth.
"When Ellen starred alongside Henry Irving in Macbeth in 1888, there was not a wide choice of fabrics available in England, and Alice could not find the colours she wanted to achieve her effects. She wanted one dress to ‘look as much like soft chain armour as I could, and yet have something that would give the appearance of the scales of a serpent.’ (Mrs. J. Comyns Carr’s ‘Reminiscences’. London: Hutchinson, 1926) Mrs. Nettlship found a twist of soft green silk and blue tinsel in Bohemia and this was crocheted to achieve the chain mail effect.
The dress hung beautifully but: ‘we did not think that it was brilliant enough, so it was sewn all over with real green beetle wings, and a narrow border in Celtic designs, worked out in rubies and diamonds, hemmed all the edges. To this was added a cloak of shot velvet in heather tones, upon which great griffens were embroidered in flame-coloured tinsel. The wimple, or veil, was held in place by a circlet of rubies, and two long plaits twisted with gold hung to her knees.’
the history blog.the guardianV&A blogspot
Zoom Info
celestialmazer:

THE ARCHAEOLOGY OF A DRESS
Restored dress as worn by Ellen Terry in her 1888 portayal of Lady Macbeth.
"When Ellen starred alongside Henry Irving in Macbeth in 1888, there was not a wide choice of fabrics available in England, and Alice could not find the colours she wanted to achieve her effects. She wanted one dress to ‘look as much like soft chain armour as I could, and yet have something that would give the appearance of the scales of a serpent.’ (Mrs. J. Comyns Carr’s ‘Reminiscences’. London: Hutchinson, 1926) Mrs. Nettlship found a twist of soft green silk and blue tinsel in Bohemia and this was crocheted to achieve the chain mail effect.
The dress hung beautifully but: ‘we did not think that it was brilliant enough, so it was sewn all over with real green beetle wings, and a narrow border in Celtic designs, worked out in rubies and diamonds, hemmed all the edges. To this was added a cloak of shot velvet in heather tones, upon which great griffens were embroidered in flame-coloured tinsel. The wimple, or veil, was held in place by a circlet of rubies, and two long plaits twisted with gold hung to her knees.’
the history blog.the guardianV&A blogspot
Zoom Info

celestialmazer:

THE ARCHAEOLOGY OF A DRESS

Restored dress as worn by Ellen Terry in her 1888 portayal of Lady Macbeth.

"When Ellen starred alongside Henry Irving in Macbeth in 1888, there was not a wide choice of fabrics available in England, and Alice could not find the colours she wanted to achieve her effects. She wanted one dress to ‘look as much like soft chain armour as I could, and yet have something that would give the appearance of the scales of a serpent.’ (Mrs. J. Comyns Carr’s ‘Reminiscences’. London: Hutchinson, 1926) Mrs. Nettlship found a twist of soft green silk and blue tinsel in Bohemia and this was crocheted to achieve the chain mail effect.

The dress hung beautifully but: ‘we did not think that it was brilliant enough, so it was sewn all over with real green beetle wings, and a narrow border in Celtic designs, worked out in rubies and diamonds, hemmed all the edges. To this was added a cloak of shot velvet in heather tones, upon which great griffens were embroidered in flame-coloured tinsel. The wimple, or veil, was held in place by a circlet of rubies, and two long plaits twisted with gold hung to her knees.’

the history blog.
the guardian
V&A 
blogspot

What Cersei would wear

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